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Interior Design Style 101

Posted by Chris Lu on

Do you know the difference between modern and transitional? Bohemian or shabby chic? What about farmhouse or rustic? We are going to do an educational course in interior design styles. After this, you will sound like an expert in knowing the difference between all the biggest design styles. It's worth mentioning that everyone's tastes are different and there are no set rules on how you want to decorate your house as long as you love it!

ART DECO

Luxurious and sumptuous best describes art deco. Short for “Arts Décoratifs,” the style was all the rage in the 1920s to 1930s—and placed a heavy emphasis on all things glamorous: Rich colors, metallics, and, sure, the occasional animal print. But while Art Deco doesn’t shy away from being extra, it’s commonly known for its bold, geometric shapes with sharp edges. So the next time you see a picture of the Chrysler Building—or even a cool sunburst mirror (they were huge back then)—you can thank Art Deco for making these timeless marvels.

BOHEMIAN

While the word “bohemian” is often associated with an artful and unconventional person, the interior design style has recently become more mainstream. But when it comes to infusing a bohemian spirit in your own home, throw out the rule book and focus on creating a relaxing space that’s personal to you. Layer your bed with throw blankets from your local vintage shop. Take Grandma’s accent chair out of storage. Create a soulful shelfie with all the trinkets you purchased on your recent trip to Africa. It’s all about creating a chill space that’s packed with personality. Every bohemian space is bound to be different, but most of them generally focus on worn-in textiles as well as vintage furniture and accessories.

COASTAL

Coastal is all about blues, whites, and nautical motifs. It’s inspired by natural elements. It is fresh like the ocean. So while you may see a vase full of seashells, a driftwood coffee table, or a color palette of soothing blues, it doesn’t have to be as literal as you’d think.

CONTEMPORARY

Contemporary and modern are terms that are often used interchangeably but there is a difference. The contemporary design is defined by the current trend. Its style is ever-changing because it’s all about what’s in at the moment. For example, if black metal is trending, it’s likely going to be considered contemporary.  The contemporary style aims to create a fashionable space without being overdone.

ECLECTIC

At first glance, you might think that eclecticism is similar to bohemian. In reality, eclectic design is more associated with bringing two, very different designs together. Want to mix traditionalism with Scandinavian style? What about minimalism with farmhouse? Eclecticism offers a blank slate to make all your wildest design dreams come true.

FARMHOUSE

No, farmhouse isn’t all chicken-themed decor and fruit basket paintings. While the farmhouse style certainly veers more into traditionalism, it’s really all about creating a warm, cozy space. Common characteristics include light, airy spaces, wooden accessories, and exposed beams, and cushy couches.

INDUSTRIAL

As the saying goes, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. When industrial design was born in the 1700s, it was a purely utilitarian style that would outfit the growing factories. It wasn’t until the ’60s and ’70s that people started to convert abandoned factories into lofts, restaurants, and hip hotels. While industrialism features pared-down materials like wood and brick, you can also expect to find sturdy iron and steel. To play off the masculine materials, many industrial homes feature a cooler, neutral color palette.

MAXIMALISM

Think more is more? Well, you’re going to love maximalism. A far cry from modernism or Scandinavian style, maximalism dares design enthusiasts to be bold. Similar to bohemian, you have the autonomy to make your space as maximalist as you’d like. Start off slow with a controlled, symmetrical maximalist à la Wes Anderson or channel your inner Austin Powers by dialing up the patterns, colors, and textures.

MID CENTURY MODERN

Mid century modern is one of the most popular interior design styles. It has survived the test of time. Rising to prominence after World War II along with tract houses, mid-century modern style is a cool, pared-down alternative to the ornate pieces of yesteryear. It’s been over 50 years since the style first hit the design scene, and it’s showing no sign of losing its luster any time soon. In fact, its simple, boxy silhouette is almost more popular than ever before.

MINIMALIST

Minimalism technically isn’t an interior design style. It’s easy to associate it with a neutral color palette, airy layout, and scarce details, but the phrase simply represents making your home less filled. So technically, you could have a coastal or bohemian home that is also minimalist.

MODERN

Rumor has it modernism and mid-century modernism aren’t as different as you’d think. While modernism came before minimalism and contemporary design, most of the pieces we consider modern—you know, simple shapes and muted hues—generally nod back to mid-century modern style.

RUSTIC

So farmhouse and rustic are exactly the same, right? Think again. While the two styles share some similarities, many believe rustic is a little rougher around the edges. Here, you’re bound to see rugged, unfinished woods like alder and hickory as well as distressed chairs, fabrics, and other accessories. It’s like farmhouse style’s outdoorsy cousin.

SCANDINAVIAN

Made popular in the 1950s by the three Scandinavian countries, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, this style emphasizes a minimalist aesthetic, a clean color palette (perhaps with the occasional pop of color), and functionality above all else. Scandi is typically light hues like white, greys and blues. Light timbers like Oak are the trademark look of this style.

SHABBY CHIC

Interested in the bohemian aesthetic, but don’t want to go all out? Give shabby chic a try. By definition, the style hits on a lot of the same elements as bohemian (think prints and distressed materials) but is paired with more put-together pieces. Go ahead, embrace shabby chic by mixing grandma’s old quilt and a sleek, mid-century side table.

TRADITIONAL

Traditionalism might be the matriarch of interior design. It's one of the oldest decorating styles. While the style draws a lot of inspiration from the past with rich colors, beautiful prints, and ornate details, there’s plenty of room to add some modern touches. Simultaneously elegant and cozy, traditional homes often integrate pieces from different eras and places (think baroque chairs with beautiful chinoiserie vases) in a clean, composed manner.

TRANSITIONAL Torn between modernism and traditionalism? Well, thanks to transitional style, it is the best of both worlds. It's classy and refined. It focuses on a minimalist aesthetic and a muted color palette of grays, tans, and off-whites, but celebrates texture. As for furniture, you can expect a mix of pieces with curved and straight lines.

Read more

Interior Design Style 101

Posted by Chris Lu on

Do you know the difference between modern and transitional? Bohemian or shabby chic? What about farmhouse or rustic? We are going to do an educational course in interior design styles. After this, you will sound like an expert in knowing the difference between all the biggest design styles. It's worth mentioning that everyone's tastes are different and there are no set rules on how you want to decorate your house as long as you love it!

ART DECO

Luxurious and sumptuous best describes art deco. Short for “Arts Décoratifs,” the style was all the rage in the 1920s to 1930s—and placed a heavy emphasis on all things glamorous: Rich colors, metallics, and, sure, the occasional animal print. But while Art Deco doesn’t shy away from being extra, it’s commonly known for its bold, geometric shapes with sharp edges. So the next time you see a picture of the Chrysler Building—or even a cool sunburst mirror (they were huge back then)—you can thank Art Deco for making these timeless marvels.

BOHEMIAN

While the word “bohemian” is often associated with an artful and unconventional person, the interior design style has recently become more mainstream. But when it comes to infusing a bohemian spirit in your own home, throw out the rule book and focus on creating a relaxing space that’s personal to you. Layer your bed with throw blankets from your local vintage shop. Take Grandma’s accent chair out of storage. Create a soulful shelfie with all the trinkets you purchased on your recent trip to Africa. It’s all about creating a chill space that’s packed with personality. Every bohemian space is bound to be different, but most of them generally focus on worn-in textiles as well as vintage furniture and accessories.

COASTAL

Coastal is all about blues, whites, and nautical motifs. It’s inspired by natural elements. It is fresh like the ocean. So while you may see a vase full of seashells, a driftwood coffee table, or a color palette of soothing blues, it doesn’t have to be as literal as you’d think.

CONTEMPORARY

Contemporary and modern are terms that are often used interchangeably but there is a difference. The contemporary design is defined by the current trend. Its style is ever-changing because it’s all about what’s in at the moment. For example, if black metal is trending, it’s likely going to be considered contemporary.  The contemporary style aims to create a fashionable space without being overdone.

ECLECTIC

At first glance, you might think that eclecticism is similar to bohemian. In reality, eclectic design is more associated with bringing two, very different designs together. Want to mix traditionalism with Scandinavian style? What about minimalism with farmhouse? Eclecticism offers a blank slate to make all your wildest design dreams come true.

FARMHOUSE

No, farmhouse isn’t all chicken-themed decor and fruit basket paintings. While the farmhouse style certainly veers more into traditionalism, it’s really all about creating a warm, cozy space. Common characteristics include light, airy spaces, wooden accessories, and exposed beams, and cushy couches.

INDUSTRIAL

As the saying goes, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. When industrial design was born in the 1700s, it was a purely utilitarian style that would outfit the growing factories. It wasn’t until the ’60s and ’70s that people started to convert abandoned factories into lofts, restaurants, and hip hotels. While industrialism features pared-down materials like wood and brick, you can also expect to find sturdy iron and steel. To play off the masculine materials, many industrial homes feature a cooler, neutral color palette.

MAXIMALISM

Think more is more? Well, you’re going to love maximalism. A far cry from modernism or Scandinavian style, maximalism dares design enthusiasts to be bold. Similar to bohemian, you have the autonomy to make your space as maximalist as you’d like. Start off slow with a controlled, symmetrical maximalist à la Wes Anderson or channel your inner Austin Powers by dialing up the patterns, colors, and textures.

MID CENTURY MODERN

Mid century modern is one of the most popular interior design styles. It has survived the test of time. Rising to prominence after World War II along with tract houses, mid-century modern style is a cool, pared-down alternative to the ornate pieces of yesteryear. It’s been over 50 years since the style first hit the design scene, and it’s showing no sign of losing its luster any time soon. In fact, its simple, boxy silhouette is almost more popular than ever before.

MINIMALIST

Minimalism technically isn’t an interior design style. It’s easy to associate it with a neutral color palette, airy layout, and scarce details, but the phrase simply represents making your home less filled. So technically, you could have a coastal or bohemian home that is also minimalist.

MODERN

Rumor has it modernism and mid-century modernism aren’t as different as you’d think. While modernism came before minimalism and contemporary design, most of the pieces we consider modern—you know, simple shapes and muted hues—generally nod back to mid-century modern style.

RUSTIC

So farmhouse and rustic are exactly the same, right? Think again. While the two styles share some similarities, many believe rustic is a little rougher around the edges. Here, you’re bound to see rugged, unfinished woods like alder and hickory as well as distressed chairs, fabrics, and other accessories. It’s like farmhouse style’s outdoorsy cousin.

SCANDINAVIAN

Made popular in the 1950s by the three Scandinavian countries, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, this style emphasizes a minimalist aesthetic, a clean color palette (perhaps with the occasional pop of color), and functionality above all else. Scandi is typically light hues like white, greys and blues. Light timbers like Oak are the trademark look of this style.

SHABBY CHIC

Interested in the bohemian aesthetic, but don’t want to go all out? Give shabby chic a try. By definition, the style hits on a lot of the same elements as bohemian (think prints and distressed materials) but is paired with more put-together pieces. Go ahead, embrace shabby chic by mixing grandma’s old quilt and a sleek, mid-century side table.

TRADITIONAL

Traditionalism might be the matriarch of interior design. It's one of the oldest decorating styles. While the style draws a lot of inspiration from the past with rich colors, beautiful prints, and ornate details, there’s plenty of room to add some modern touches. Simultaneously elegant and cozy, traditional homes often integrate pieces from different eras and places (think baroque chairs with beautiful chinoiserie vases) in a clean, composed manner.

TRANSITIONAL Torn between modernism and traditionalism? Well, thanks to transitional style, it is the best of both worlds. It's classy and refined. It focuses on a minimalist aesthetic and a muted color palette of grays, tans, and off-whites, but celebrates texture. As for furniture, you can expect a mix of pieces with curved and straight lines.

Read more


Does Birth Order Determine Your Decorating Style

Posted by Chris Lu on

Is there a correlation between your decorating style and your birth order? To start, there other influences in your environment that help contribute your sense of style like social media, life experiences, websites and design magazines to name a few.

But according to Ana Jovanovic, “There is a lot of research on how birth order affects personality traits.” She is a clinical psychologist at Parenting Pod, a resource for parents and educators about mental health and well being. “There are a lot of factors within a person’s environment and upbringing that affect their personality. Still the research can provide us with some hypotheses to test through our own experiences.”

FIRSTBORNS
Firstborns tend to be anxious because they are usually exposed to higher levels of parental anxiety. With their firstborn, parents are experiencing being parents for the very first time. The firstborn’s actions are usually under the magnifying glass. As a result, many researchers have found that firstborns tend to deal with that pressure by having a higher level of anxiety. As a result, firstborns tend to decorate with calming influences like white or gray walls, plain flooring, the simplest of light fixtures and lots of plants. Symmetry like matching nightstands or table lamps are also inherent. Curved furniture are preferred over boxy, sharp angle shapes are slightly less appealing because they’re low-key anxiety-inducing.

Greenery also speaks to the firstborn’s tendency to nurture. This could be a result to feel more obligated to provide for their families, to assume responsibility, or to define the rules once they perceive things out of order. So lots of houseplants and Marie Kondo-ing for the firstborns.

Lastly, firstborns tend to be more traditional and connected to their parents, especially compared to their younger siblings. They might find themselves liking more traditional decor that reminds them of their homes growing up. Flea market finds, aged woods, and traditional turned legs are all things you might expect a firstborn to gravitate towards.

MIDDLE
Middle child syndrome is something that gets a lot of play in pop culture and society, but how does finding their way between older siblings, who get more responsibility, and the younger ones, who get more indulgences, play into decorating style? Middle children usually relate well to people and develop better communication skills. So they might gravitate towards a neon sign or typographic print in an interior. It’s not in the middle child’s nature to be subtle. The middle child decorating style tend to be more adventurous and bold.

Middle kids are perceived to love anything that really communicates their personality or says “look at me,” from collectibles to one-of-a-kind art or even a cool graphic rug or throw.

YOUNGEST
Youngest children are usually treated as the ‘babies’ of the family, circled by the attention. They want to do things not only well but better than the older kids, thereby proving that they are not the ‘babies’ others may feel they are. So if you’re a last-born, you might find yourself into more sophisticated, glam pieces and intricate silhouettes. Art Deco is your spirit decorating style. Because you’re fancy like that.

The youngest may also feel the need to differentiate themselves from all the other kids by doing something different and unconventional, that other kids still haven’t thought of. Decorating with punches of color and pattern like wallpaper or accent wall. The youngest child tend to have more confidence. They are willing to go after a trend because it shows inventiveness.

ONLY CHILD
The birth order study cited above found that only children display lots of firstborn tendencies, both in terms of drive and focus on achievement. They tend to be a little selfish since they aren’t used to sharing the spotlight with siblings. And only children tend to be incredibly ambitious as opposed to anxious. In terms of decorating, only kids love mixing patterns, textures and colors. They pick a style or a palette and definitely follow through on it. They also can layer —rugs, textiles, lighting options within a room—like a designer.

Read more

Does Birth Order Determine Your Decorating Style

Posted by Chris Lu on

Is there a correlation between your decorating style and your birth order? To start, there other influences in your environment that help contribute your sense of style like social media, life experiences, websites and design magazines to name a few.

But according to Ana Jovanovic, “There is a lot of research on how birth order affects personality traits.” She is a clinical psychologist at Parenting Pod, a resource for parents and educators about mental health and well being. “There are a lot of factors within a person’s environment and upbringing that affect their personality. Still the research can provide us with some hypotheses to test through our own experiences.”

FIRSTBORNS
Firstborns tend to be anxious because they are usually exposed to higher levels of parental anxiety. With their firstborn, parents are experiencing being parents for the very first time. The firstborn’s actions are usually under the magnifying glass. As a result, many researchers have found that firstborns tend to deal with that pressure by having a higher level of anxiety. As a result, firstborns tend to decorate with calming influences like white or gray walls, plain flooring, the simplest of light fixtures and lots of plants. Symmetry like matching nightstands or table lamps are also inherent. Curved furniture are preferred over boxy, sharp angle shapes are slightly less appealing because they’re low-key anxiety-inducing.

Greenery also speaks to the firstborn’s tendency to nurture. This could be a result to feel more obligated to provide for their families, to assume responsibility, or to define the rules once they perceive things out of order. So lots of houseplants and Marie Kondo-ing for the firstborns.

Lastly, firstborns tend to be more traditional and connected to their parents, especially compared to their younger siblings. They might find themselves liking more traditional decor that reminds them of their homes growing up. Flea market finds, aged woods, and traditional turned legs are all things you might expect a firstborn to gravitate towards.

MIDDLE
Middle child syndrome is something that gets a lot of play in pop culture and society, but how does finding their way between older siblings, who get more responsibility, and the younger ones, who get more indulgences, play into decorating style? Middle children usually relate well to people and develop better communication skills. So they might gravitate towards a neon sign or typographic print in an interior. It’s not in the middle child’s nature to be subtle. The middle child decorating style tend to be more adventurous and bold.

Middle kids are perceived to love anything that really communicates their personality or says “look at me,” from collectibles to one-of-a-kind art or even a cool graphic rug or throw.

YOUNGEST
Youngest children are usually treated as the ‘babies’ of the family, circled by the attention. They want to do things not only well but better than the older kids, thereby proving that they are not the ‘babies’ others may feel they are. So if you’re a last-born, you might find yourself into more sophisticated, glam pieces and intricate silhouettes. Art Deco is your spirit decorating style. Because you’re fancy like that.

The youngest may also feel the need to differentiate themselves from all the other kids by doing something different and unconventional, that other kids still haven’t thought of. Decorating with punches of color and pattern like wallpaper or accent wall. The youngest child tend to have more confidence. They are willing to go after a trend because it shows inventiveness.

ONLY CHILD
The birth order study cited above found that only children display lots of firstborn tendencies, both in terms of drive and focus on achievement. They tend to be a little selfish since they aren’t used to sharing the spotlight with siblings. And only children tend to be incredibly ambitious as opposed to anxious. In terms of decorating, only kids love mixing patterns, textures and colors. They pick a style or a palette and definitely follow through on it. They also can layer —rugs, textiles, lighting options within a room—like a designer.

Read more


Common Home Renos that Can Actually Lower the Home's Market Value

Posted by Chris Lu on

You would automatically think that a home renovation will increase the market value of the house. Updating a home is always a good thing but the most common mistake people do is to put their preferences into the selection rather than the tastes of the potential future owner. When it’s time for the homeowner to sell their house, it's a misconception that a home which has had a massive renovation with all the bells and whistles will garner a higher price. Most of the time, the bells and whistles have little or no value to the future buyer no matter how much it cost the homeowner, thus decreasing the home's value in relation to the money spent. To avoid this you can follow the KISS rule of "Keep It Simple, Stupid" when it comes to home renovations. This might save you a lot of money and headaches.

Here are 10 common renovations that can lower your house value:

UNIQUE TILING

Try to go neutral with the tiles because they are hard to rip up and replace. People automatically think about the high expense of replacing tiles. Personalise the space with a unique rug instead.

CARPETING

Remember this fact, 54% of homebuyers are willing to pay more for timber floors. If you have the opportunity to replace carpet with timber flooring in the main living areas, it's worth the expense. Carpet colours and styles tend to be based on personal preference.

HIGH END KITCHEN

Kitchens are high value items but avoid over spending with all the bells and whistles. Focus on the visual items that people see and not in the internal components.  A recent study showed that people spent an average of $60,000 on their kitchen renovation but only got a $38,000 return.

LUXURY BATHROOMS

Same rules apply as the kitchen. Do just enough to satisfy what people are looking for. For example a soaker tub is a luxury, an airjet tub is extravagant.

CONVERTING BEDROOM TO A HOME OFFICE Unless you have more bedrooms than you will ever need, a bedroom will trump a home office in perceived value anytime. Just use office furniture that can be moved out and the space can be converted back into a bedroom. Avoid built ins. A bedroom is worth 10% more to the home value than an office.

COMBINING BEDROOMS

Tread carefully when combining bedrooms that are next to each other into a massive bedroom. It's a numbers game when it comes to bedrooms at resale. SWIMMING POOLS

It is a misconception that swimming pools increase a home's value. Most potential buyers see them as a safety hazard for children and a high maintenance item. FANCY LIGHT FIXTURES

Dramatic lighting can backfire on you if it turns off potential buyers. If the light fixtures don't match the style of the home, it is also less appealing.

WALLPAPER

Wallpaper is such a personal choice and is notoriously difficult to remove. Consider painting the wall a different colour for that pop.

BOLD PAINT

Bold paint colours are subjective. The good side is that people can resolve it in their minds as an easy and low cost fix so the effect on home price is nominal.

Read more

You would automatically think that a home renovation will increase the market value of the house. Updating a home is always a good thing but the most common mistake people do is to put their preferences into the selection rather than the tastes of the potential future owner. When it’s time for the homeowner to sell their house, it's a misconception that a home which has had a massive renovation with all the bells and whistles will garner a higher price. Most of the time, the bells and whistles have little or no value to the future buyer no matter how much it cost the homeowner, thus decreasing the home's value in relation to the money spent. To avoid this you can follow the KISS rule of "Keep It Simple, Stupid" when it comes to home renovations. This might save you a lot of money and headaches.

Here are 10 common renovations that can lower your house value:

UNIQUE TILING

Try to go neutral with the tiles because they are hard to rip up and replace. People automatically think about the high expense of replacing tiles. Personalise the space with a unique rug instead.

CARPETING

Remember this fact, 54% of homebuyers are willing to pay more for timber floors. If you have the opportunity to replace carpet with timber flooring in the main living areas, it's worth the expense. Carpet colours and styles tend to be based on personal preference.

HIGH END KITCHEN

Kitchens are high value items but avoid over spending with all the bells and whistles. Focus on the visual items that people see and not in the internal components.  A recent study showed that people spent an average of $60,000 on their kitchen renovation but only got a $38,000 return.

LUXURY BATHROOMS

Same rules apply as the kitchen. Do just enough to satisfy what people are looking for. For example a soaker tub is a luxury, an airjet tub is extravagant.

CONVERTING BEDROOM TO A HOME OFFICE Unless you have more bedrooms than you will ever need, a bedroom will trump a home office in perceived value anytime. Just use office furniture that can be moved out and the space can be converted back into a bedroom. Avoid built ins. A bedroom is worth 10% more to the home value than an office.

COMBINING BEDROOMS

Tread carefully when combining bedrooms that are next to each other into a massive bedroom. It's a numbers game when it comes to bedrooms at resale. SWIMMING POOLS

It is a misconception that swimming pools increase a home's value. Most potential buyers see them as a safety hazard for children and a high maintenance item. FANCY LIGHT FIXTURES

Dramatic lighting can backfire on you if it turns off potential buyers. If the light fixtures don't match the style of the home, it is also less appealing.

WALLPAPER

Wallpaper is such a personal choice and is notoriously difficult to remove. Consider painting the wall a different colour for that pop.

BOLD PAINT

Bold paint colours are subjective. The good side is that people can resolve it in their minds as an easy and low cost fix so the effect on home price is nominal.

Read more


Cracking the Design Code

Posted by Chris Lu on

Who wants to have the designer look in their home? It might seem daunting to most people but you just need to know what to look for. Designers use these seven tips to create a well curated home that has a balance of style and personality.

ONE FOCAL POINT

Each room has one focal point to draw your eye once you enter the room. It can be a built in detail, furniture or artwork. This is very important.

GO ORGANIC

Elements such as plants, branches, shells or natural fibres add life to interiors. Try putting plants in corners to soften the right angles.

MAKE IT PERSONAL

What's a home without personal items that you love or evidence of experiences? Surround yourself with things that you love. You can't go wrong here.

MAKE A STATEMENT

Design classics like the Eames lounge chair or Mutto Cloud sofa are timeless and add style. You don't need a lot and only get pieces you love. Avoid replicas because originals will have much more meaning and last longer.

DO THE UNEXPECTED

Allow yourself to have some weird or unexpected pieces to add personality to your space. Your space doesn't need to be perfect.

EMPTY SPACES

Resist decorating every empty space. An empty space can make just as much impact.

TEXTURE

Create a multilayered look using different elements such as marble, metal, fabric, timber and leather. If there are too many smooth surfaces the space will feel cold. Too much the other way and you lose a feeling of serenity.

Read more

Cracking the Design Code

Posted by Chris Lu on

Who wants to have the designer look in their home? It might seem daunting to most people but you just need to know what to look for. Designers use these seven tips to create a well curated home that has a balance of style and personality.

ONE FOCAL POINT

Each room has one focal point to draw your eye once you enter the room. It can be a built in detail, furniture or artwork. This is very important.

GO ORGANIC

Elements such as plants, branches, shells or natural fibres add life to interiors. Try putting plants in corners to soften the right angles.

MAKE IT PERSONAL

What's a home without personal items that you love or evidence of experiences? Surround yourself with things that you love. You can't go wrong here.

MAKE A STATEMENT

Design classics like the Eames lounge chair or Mutto Cloud sofa are timeless and add style. You don't need a lot and only get pieces you love. Avoid replicas because originals will have much more meaning and last longer.

DO THE UNEXPECTED

Allow yourself to have some weird or unexpected pieces to add personality to your space. Your space doesn't need to be perfect.

EMPTY SPACES

Resist decorating every empty space. An empty space can make just as much impact.

TEXTURE

Create a multilayered look using different elements such as marble, metal, fabric, timber and leather. If there are too many smooth surfaces the space will feel cold. Too much the other way and you lose a feeling of serenity.

Read more


Clever Ways To Keep Your Home Cool

Posted by Chris Lu on

The beginning of summer is always welcome but sometimes the heat can be stifling. Keep in mind that air conditioning might not be good for your health or wallet. Did you know that air con has been known to circulate air-borne diseases such as Legionnaire’s Disease, a potentially fatal infectious disease that produces high fever and pneumonia? It also makes you more vulnerable to catching a cold and flu...not to mention drying your skin!

Here are some ideas to keep it cool naturally:

Lightweight bedding

Ditch the winter doona! Changing seasons means changing the type of bedding. Consider lightweight quilts and covers. Natural fibres like cotton and linen are ideal for your sheets because they boost airflow during sleeping. Look at lower thread count like 300-400 so it's not too heavy. Even the colour makes a difference because light colours reflect heat from the sun instead of absorbing it.

Flick the switch

Avoid unnecessary heat by unplugging all appliance when not in use. Electrical outlets continue emitting energy and heat even if not in use. 

Create a breeze

Fans are an energy efficient way to cool. It is also more natural. The easiest solution is to get portable fans. If you can, install ceiling fans in areas where you spend most of your time - like the lounge room and bedroom. The ideal placement is to position any fan across from open windows to encourage circulation and make the most of breezes. If you have ceiling fans with speed settings, adjust them to rotate counter-clockwise at high speed as this creates a wind chill breeze effect. Lastly, turn on your bathroom exhaust fan and leave it on as this will expel hot air out of the room.

Block out the heat

Keep the heat out by closing blinds and drawing curtains. Black out curtains are effective in blocking out heat from the sun. 

Keep it closed

If it is hot outside, keep your windows closed. If there is a cool breeze, open them. This rule also applies to doors.

Be shady in a good way

Strategically placed trees outside can make a world of difference to your home. Planting them on the north side will give you the most benefit. Once a tree reaches three meters it will pay off in spades. Shade will make you feel 10 - 15 degrees cooler because you are sheltered from sun radiation.

Read more

Clever Ways To Keep Your Home Cool

Posted by Chris Lu on

The beginning of summer is always welcome but sometimes the heat can be stifling. Keep in mind that air conditioning might not be good for your health or wallet. Did you know that air con has been known to circulate air-borne diseases such as Legionnaire’s Disease, a potentially fatal infectious disease that produces high fever and pneumonia? It also makes you more vulnerable to catching a cold and flu...not to mention drying your skin!

Here are some ideas to keep it cool naturally:

Lightweight bedding

Ditch the winter doona! Changing seasons means changing the type of bedding. Consider lightweight quilts and covers. Natural fibres like cotton and linen are ideal for your sheets because they boost airflow during sleeping. Look at lower thread count like 300-400 so it's not too heavy. Even the colour makes a difference because light colours reflect heat from the sun instead of absorbing it.

Flick the switch

Avoid unnecessary heat by unplugging all appliance when not in use. Electrical outlets continue emitting energy and heat even if not in use. 

Create a breeze

Fans are an energy efficient way to cool. It is also more natural. The easiest solution is to get portable fans. If you can, install ceiling fans in areas where you spend most of your time - like the lounge room and bedroom. The ideal placement is to position any fan across from open windows to encourage circulation and make the most of breezes. If you have ceiling fans with speed settings, adjust them to rotate counter-clockwise at high speed as this creates a wind chill breeze effect. Lastly, turn on your bathroom exhaust fan and leave it on as this will expel hot air out of the room.

Block out the heat

Keep the heat out by closing blinds and drawing curtains. Black out curtains are effective in blocking out heat from the sun. 

Keep it closed

If it is hot outside, keep your windows closed. If there is a cool breeze, open them. This rule also applies to doors.

Be shady in a good way

Strategically placed trees outside can make a world of difference to your home. Planting them on the north side will give you the most benefit. Once a tree reaches three meters it will pay off in spades. Shade will make you feel 10 - 15 degrees cooler because you are sheltered from sun radiation.

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